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20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)
restaurant in garden grove, california and she's been there since 1989. >> all this pressure. >> reporter: since she was a small child, lauren's mother has warned her, never share kim chi with non-koreans. >> they cannot adjust to eating. it's not good. >> while this cabbage dish is a staple in many korean families, its pungent aroma can be off putting for people who didn't grow up with it. i have mother-in-law's kim chi and a vegan recipe. >> that's why it's ironic several years later lauren has built a successful business producing kim chi and sells it at whole foods and grocery stores. >> they will look at me, that's odd, wise she serving kim chi to non-koreans. >> that's how lauren thought about kim chi, too, until five years ago when she lost her job as a high end wine promoter. >> when the financial downturn hit and i lost my marketing job, instead of looking for the next marketing job in another company, i thought it was the right opportunity to go into business for myself. >> she realized she could useun and cheese market to introduce kim chi to a new base. >> she takes it to the
, and there is a great analogy out there that if you take out in a airplane from california to new york, and you are off by one degree, you end up in canada. so if you take off course even slightly, you will be off course gradually. >> and we were talking that they had five top retailers and they were spending more time on the other others, and you have to cut them out. >> can i plug the book? i won't ask you, because in the "pumpkin plan" i talk about the vine vines. if you want to grow the big pumpkin, you have to get rid of the rotting ones to allow the nutrients to go to the big one. get rid of the diseased vendors. >> but before you do, ask them why it is not working out. and sometimes with an unhappy customer, they can be a great source of information and find out what they are not liking to fix the problem. >> and contacts are so important and they were manufacturing in turkey, because one moved there and they could not do it, and they could not find a way to do it and cost efficient way in new york city, and when we introduce them to people, we find out it is cost efficient and gets rid of all o
. that can work. >> and great analogy that if you take off in an airplane from new york to california, and you're off by one degree you end up in canada. the longer you continue off-course, even if it's small you get really far from your destination so they need to make small corrections to get back there but they need to make them sooner rather than later. >> the one we were harping on was 4 of 20 retailers were working for them and they were spending all the time on the other retailers so it's hard but you got to cut those customers out. >> you do. can i plug my book? i'm not even going to ask because i'll do it. if you want to grow a giant pumpkin it the rotting diseased pumpkins you have to get rid of first to allow the nutrients to go to go big pumpkin. get rid of the diseased vendors. >> before you do, ask them why things aren't working out. same thing with unhappy customers. sometimes they can be a big source of information. find out what they don't like so maybe that can help you fix the problem. >> and contacts were so important. they were manufacturing in turkey because one
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)